Currently viewing the tag: "Saint Laurent Paris"

The leather jackets from Saint Laurent are some of my absolutely favorites. This lambskin version from SS17 has an easy to wear cropped cut and the usual essential details on a riders jacket. The zippers are off-set with zip and flap pockets at the front.

If you’re into double riders and want one that feels more luxe in terms of hardware, details with a more modern cut it’d be difficult to go wrong with this one. The only downside is the high price point.

Available at SSENSE.

For more advice on selecting the ideal leather, take a look at this guide.

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Honeyee presents their take on the Fall/Winter 2014 Saint Laurent Paris collection by inviting  famed Japanese actor Tadanobu Asano to model. Asano has starred in films including  Ichi the Killer and Thor and is a household name in Japan. The best piece here is the leather rider, but Asano also pulls off the varsity and is in the 1% of human beings who can wear a white fur overcoat well. 

More images after the jump

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Boris Bidjan Saberi 

Boris compliments this well-cut suit with a boots, a t-shirt and a rain-shell, adding a casual feel to an otherwise tailored look. The entire show revealed maturity and growth from the German designer and it ranks as one of his best to date.

Juun J

Juun was one of the designers championing a fuller cut this season and he executed it in style. The highlight of the show were pieces which were variants on the MA-1 design.  Presented here with creative layer, an oversized turteneck and Duke Nukem army cut Juun shows he’s in strong form in 2013.

Damir Doma

A slightly slouchy silhouette mixed with a all grey tonal fit make this outfit worth considering for Fall. Damir is able to pull off a series of romantic AND wearable looks this collection. For FW13 he has refined his aeshetic and make it a little bit more accessible to men this season without losing the essence of his design style.

Rick Owens

Rick Owens has been a major influence in men’s fashion over the past 10 year and in that time created his own fashion universe.  Here Rick presents a cleaned up minimal take on the goth-glam look that’s become his trademark. The belted samurai jacket returns with cleaner lines underneath his signiture leather pattern. Th personal highlight for me on this fit is the paneled leather pants but the whole thing just looks incredibly badass. It’s always a pleasure to see how Rick continues to evolve as a designer without every straying too far from his roots.

Dries Van Noten

Dries brings a more somber presentation for this fall/winter collection with a palette of earth tones and paisley prints. The quilted bomber here is something Dries executes so well. The minimal collar, slim but still puffy shape and patterned trousers put this look on my list.

Saint Laurent Paris Men’s

One of the most anticipated shows in Paris, Hedi sets out to prove that rock isn’t quite dead. I gave Hedi a hard time with his debut womenswear collection but I’m pretty pleased with his debut men’s showing. This look from the show is deceptively simple but it’s execution is spot-on for what Hedi wants to achieve. While many designers try to incorporate rock influences, this just looks the part effortlessly. The way it should always be in rock’n’roll.

Miharayasuhiro

The title of this collection is ‘Chinpira’ meaning ‘Punk’ celebrates a movement largely characterized by a concern for individual freedom and anti-establishment views. This stood out as one of my favorite collections all week as it struck a delicate balance between intricately crafted luxurious garments and subcultural styling. The above look has a yakuza feel and the glasses definitely Chow Yun Fat from John Woo’s The Killer in the best way possible.

Yohji Yamamoto

Yohji Yamamoto is a master and he has once again put together a collection that any man would be lucky to have in their wardrobes. What I loved about this particular look was the cut of the camel overcoat and the little details fro the shape of the boots to  the look of the pull over-hat. The leopard print hat and glued on mustaches of the models add a welcome dose of quirkiness and humor to an otherwise serious affair.

Junya Watanabe

Since his moto collection Junya hasn’t put a ton of black in his collections but this mostly-black look is Junya at his best. The washed out denim chore coat hung on the shoulders with the patchwork blazer underneath and the not too baggy/not too slim cropped trousers add up to a brilliant outfit.

Louis Vuitton

Kim Jones has really revitalized Louis Vuitton menswear and made the brand relevant again to fashionable guys worldwide. With looks like this, it’s easy to see why. The tonal plaid suit layered underneath the show-stopping shearling parka just looks incredible. The styling with the toque and t-shirt add just enough chav to keep these luxurious clothes from being only the domain of rich white men. I imagine this is how Eastern Promises would have looked with a larger wardrobe budget.

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Hedi Slimane styles and shoots Edie Campbell and Beck for the Spring/Summer 2013 Saint Laurent Paris campaign in this slideshow style video. Beck is the third rock star to be shot for the Saint Laurent campaigns, the other two being The being Christopher Owens from Girls and Tom Burke from Citizens. Anticipation is building for his first men’s collection under the SLP label which will be unveiled during Paris Men’s fashion week in a matter of days.

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Saint Laurent Eyewear via Vogues Homme Japan

As the fashion set worldwide anxiously awaits Hedi Slimane’s designers under the Saint Laurent Paris label, I believe this is an appropriate time to reflect on his viewpoints on digital media and fashion. In particular this 2010 Style.com interview with the Saint Laurent Paris creative director has stayed in my mind and stands out as something worth re-visiting .  Mr.Slimane is questioned  by Dirk Standen  and proceeds to  speak on varied topics including the relevance of  runway  shows and the broader impact of media in the increasingly connected and fast-moving media climate. I’ve included some of the highlights below.

How do you think technology—tweeting, blogging, social media, etc.—has affected fashion? For better or worse?
It has affected different aspects of fashion tremendously. From commentary to fashion design, communication, and distribution.

The fashion Internet community is like a global digital agora tweeting passions and opinions. Anyone knows better, and each one is a self-made critic.

This is a fascinating idea, as I always favored amateurism (”the one that loves”) over professionalism, attraction over experience. It obliges anyone in the industry to think in a fresher way.

Of course, it is hard to say if any “authority,” someone like Suzy Menkes, might one day come out and use digital means to lead with integrity, enough background, outside of any conflict of interest.

On a design perspective, it has allowed any young designer or indie brand to get an instant audience, if used with wit and invention.

I am not quite sure of the future of retail as we know it. This is a truly important thing, maybe the most important one, as it might already mean there is nothing standing between the design and an audience/consumer.

Finally, the better and the worse have always been part of fashion, with the Internet only magnifying it and creating a joyful and noisy digital chaos.

The bottom line is that any note can create music. It is only a matter of taste.

Some people are questioning whether, in an era when information is disseminated so quickly, fashion shows still matter. As someone who has been both a participant and observer, do you think fashion shows are still an important and effective method of presentation?
I understand the options, but there is something else besides information.

Fashion somehow, for me, is purely and happily irrational.

I like the ritual, the liturgy of a well-crafted, emotional fashion show. I will never be jaded with this side of fashion. The “catwalk” is pure anthropology, something like an esoteric encrypted parade. It can totally be replaced but it will be missed.

Archaisms do have some reassuring charms, unless the Internet is used creatively, and in a poetic way.

The problem is also the number of brands that insist, for vanity or desperation and beyond common sense, to squeeze into the endless fashion weeks of the world for the wrong reasons.

Some of them would benefit from different methods to present their collections.

The silhouette you proposed for men at Dior Homme is in many ways still the dominant silhouette today. Are you surprised by how long it has lasted? Do you see it changing?

I started to work on my silhouette since the end of my Saint Laurent years, when I had the option to pursue my own style. I also started it because it was the only thing that would fit me, to be totally honest.

I became very repetitive with it over the years, as I was trying to define it accurately.

I always thought it was all about repetition, and I became extremely stubborn despite my opponents and the natural aim of the fashion industry to look for something new each season. I never wanted to please, as long as I could follow my beliefs. I always and only thought about my own time and the birth of an entire generation.

I heard so much about my proportions, and how absurd and unsuccessful, for instance, my skinny jeans and silhouette would be. I also heard about my lack of definition in masculinity, as I was aiming to try another definition. I also was questioned about my attraction to music, as I still believe there is no fashion without music. Marie Antoinette knew better when she fetched Gluck to Versailles, to try her new wardrobe on the dance floor. Nothing will ever change. Fashion = music + youth + sex. This is what my menswear and my style were always about.

Besides the proportions, it was about an allure, a certain movement.

I always believed the way men or women wear clothes (le porté, in French) defines fashion, and funnily enough, through history, furniture design.

So that it was never a “fashion comment,” as I was interacting directly, and still do on my own, with unknown musicians, artists, street casting for my shows. It was not about doing punk rock or metal when punk rock or metal had no relevance to the moment. My fashion and my style were like a random and sometimes intimate diary. Living in Berlin, I interacted with the music scene at a time when Berlin was aiming to set up an abstract and ethereal digital tone; my years in London happened to be the time when a new indie scene emerged among my friends. There were no clothes available around, so I designed them for the rest of us. These are the clothes we wanted to wear, and these are the clothes, allure, and style that ended up my own.

Read the entire interview HERE

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