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With the winter solstice and end of the Mayan calendar mere hours away (in the Eastern timezone at least) many of us will be reflecting on the vastness of the universe and what it all means. These photos probably won’t answer any existential questions but they do have the added benefit of just looking really damn cool. French photographer Vincent Fournier has put together a vast collection of photos under the name Space Project. In them you will find portraits of the physicists, engineers and scientists exploring mankind’s final frontier.

Photos via It’s Nice That and you can find more information on Vincent Fournier’s project.

More after the jump

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The one aspect of LN-CC that I admire most is the site’s willingness to take risks with its buys and to bring different perspectives on styling, fashion and culture. I was on the site today and came across the above visuals which document the religious and secular groups which broke away from mainstream American lifestyles to pursue an ideal of Utopian living.

LN-CC has selected a series of book titles that chronicle aspects of the visual, ideological and experiential elements of these uptopian movements. Among the most famous of these books is the Whole Earth Catalog.

“In 1968 Whole Earth Catalog was first published, becoming the most instrumental publication in the growth of sixties and seventies counterculture communities. Founded by Stewart Brand, the catalogue offered an amazing range of tools, services and information, not only for back-to-the-land communities but also for progressive minds in the fields of architecture and technology. The catalogue attributed its founding to Buckminster Fuller, the systems theorist, inventor and futurist designer and architect who popularised the geodesic dome. One of the first rural communes of the sixties, Drop City, was also inspired by Fuller’s work. The commune was based on the principle of ‘life as art’ and their iconic domes built from salvaged parts became the crowning representation of this new way of living.”

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