Currently viewing the tag: "Gucci"

The bulky designer sneaker thing is literally everywhere this season and of course Gucci isn’t missing out on the trend. Gucci is experiencing huge growth for many reasons, it’s a favorite amongst the Hollywood/celebrity elite and their designs are distinctively gaudy in a way that stands out in today’s market. Their entrance into the sneaker category this season however is carefully balanced between luxury branding and minimal design. These leather low tops are featured a Logo flag at padded tongue and a padded collar for comfort. The Gucci Logo stamp is delivered in glittered gold-tone and the usual stripes in red and green printed at outer side. These will set you back  a pretty penny but for the ballers out there, the stunt factor alone may be worth it.

Available at SSENSE

 

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Joey wears Gucci hat, Versace sports tee, Polo Black Label jeans, silver Jordan 1s, Kenzo iPhone case

Bradley wears Louis Vuitton Beanie, Bradley Garret Leigh Sunglasses and aNYthing T-shirt

Many of us who grew up in the 90s look to the years just before 9/11 with a certain reverence. There was a feeling of naivety growing up in that seemingly utopic time, a feeling of youthful confidence expressed through personal style. Most of us wore variations of the same gear: backpacks, jerseys, hoodies, t-shirts and jeans. The differences in design were subtle from piece to piece, but it was the brand names (and their associations) that set items apart. Looking back at how we dressed through that period, there is certainly an element of disgust and regret, but we cannot deny that underlying layer of nostalgia, that feeling we had rocking the gear the first time around.

We’d mix mall labels with sneakers and covet luxury items that were unattainable status symbols. Brands were more than a representation of taste or quality, they could provide a sense of belonging; entrance into a cooler world. This is an emotion that new labels unabashedly evoke in 2013. Consider this editorial an ode to unsubtle branding and the powerful impact it continues to have on fashion.

Rhamier wear Crooks & Castles Fitted & Supreme L/S T-Shirt 

 Stylist’s note 

“I was going through a mallrat-eurotrash-pinoy-guido phase in 2001, 16-17 years old wearing all sorts of goofy logo-heavy shit meanwhile tapering my eyebrows, lining up my non-existent sideburns, spiking my hair, etc. Strangely, I was voted best dressed junior year of high school in Berlin…? Of all the prodigies at the time, Aaliyah sticks out most in my mind. In particular, Red Album Aaliyah in the We Need A Resolution video dancing on a virtual stage, wearing a loud silver D&G monogram belt—a belt I subsequently became obsessed with. When I moved to New York in 2002 and finally had access to ebay, I went HAM, scoring a knockoff DG belt which I proudly wore with a pair of real D&G bleached- washed elastic jeans. Same year I bought some Burberry fabric to sew on my AF1s. Over a decade later, Rocky and I shot this with friends in celebration of my 28th birthday.

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2013 has been a big year for Rome Fortune. Coming out the Atlanta scene he’s built up significant buzz with his ‘Beautiful Pimp’ mixtape. Frequent collaborators C4 and Childish Major have been lacing him with experimental instrumentals that compliment his effortless laid-back delivery. He was a feature on the recent Gucci Mane joint ‘Stripes’ and just ripped a set alongside PTP family Gila Monster at 285 Kent in Brooklyn.

Outside of his music prowess, Rome is someone you’ll always see expressing his personal style through his clothing choices. When we first met, he told me that he had been a fan of Third Looks for some time, so it’s nice to bring things full circle with this feature. Rome and I had a conversation that touches on hip-hop style, girls and world rap domination.

Be sure to check the brand video for his single ‘Get the Guap” HERE and click through to read the interview.

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IT GIRL TOKYO: Caca Co

Third Looks is going international with our latest IT GIRL feature. I’m proud to introduce Caca Co from Tokyo. It is a dream for many women to work in the fashion industry and one that Caca is pursuing to the fullest in Asia. A special thank you goes out to Rajiv Sawhney for producing this feature and making it look fantastic. He will be contributing content from the Japanese fashion scene and documenting his personal journey in the creation of his own namesake label, Sawhney. -Rocky

Words by Rajiv Sawhney

As a budding menswear designer, I had the opportunity to meet Caca, a half-Japanese/half-Chinese fashion student and model through a personal connection several months ago. We quickly became friends given our mutual interests. What struck me most about Caca, aside from her cute looks, was her maturity at a still relatively young age and her deep knowledge and appreciation for the Tokyo scene. Naturally, when I bounced ideas with Rocky about a potential IT GIRL TOKYO edition, Caca immediately came to mind as the first candidate. With the help of fellow friend and photographer, Daisuke Ito, we took to the streets of Daikanyama to bring you the first IT GIRL TOKYO.

Firstly, can you give a quick introduction about yourself?

My name is Caca. I was born in Xian, China and grew up in Tsingtao. My first time visiting Japan was during my sophomore year of high school. I also spent time in Fukuoka and Kyoto for high school and undergraduate college. Currently I’m a graduate student at Bunka Fashion College (http://www.bunka-fc.ac.jp) studying fashion management. To enrich my life and social experience I’m also a part-time model and love to party, enjoying the energy of fashion through Tokyo’s nightlife.

What made you want to come to Japan to study? Did you always want to study fashion?

I wanted to come to Japan for a very simple reason. Since I was a child, I loved Japanese animation and wanted to become an anime artist. However, after studying animation for two years at Kyoto Seika University (http://www.kyoto-seika.ac.jp), I realized that it would be difficult to transmit my points of view and concepts to audiences unless I became an animation director. Meanwhile, like other young girls, I started to take more interest in my make up and styling and gradually became more interested in fashion. Ultimately fashion became my true calling and I quit animation school to study at Bunka. Even though my friends were surprised by my decision, they continue to support what I’m doing. I also want to thank my father for forgiving my willfulness and for continuing to support me.

LOOK 1
Outer: Men’s Number (N)ine black destroyed leather napoleon riders jacket
Top: Loveless (http://www.loveless-shop.jp)
Pants: MNG Collection
Shoes: Christian Louboutin
Sunglasses: Gucci
Hat: Loveless (http://www.loveless-shop.jp)

You are now finishing up your final year at Bunka Fashion College. How has the experience been?

Every day I’m exposed to new things and the curriculum is very meticulous and professional. Students can elect to study from a wide variety of majors including design, styling, etc. I chose management as my major. Unlike other majors, we have the opportunity to hold shows, visit shops to do field surveys, and go on the streets to take photographs. The most interesting aspect of my studies has been the analysis of seasonal trends and the emphasis on the brand creation process. My dream is to start my own brand.

You also recently interned at Mark Styler, a major Japanese women’s wear company. Can you describe the experience?

Mark Styler (http://mark-styler.co.jp) is the parent company of my favorite Japanese fashion brand, EMODA (http://www.emoda-japan.com). Through an introduction from my professor, I was honored to receive a month long internship program at the Mark Styler head office to help with their 2012 Autumn/Winter show. Through this internship, I was able to gain a deeper understanding of the industry, particularly the unglamorous side of the business. In order to execute a perfect fashion show, every department was extremely busy. I worked in the media department and learned it’s not enough to have a good designer or pattern maker, but also an excellent media department to successfully market a brands image. Frankly speaking, very little differentiates fashionable Japanese brands these days. Therefore, how the media/publicity department markets a brand’s image has become increasingly important. After the fashion show was successfully completed, I realized that all the hard work was worth it. It was a very memorable experience and a great learning opportunity.

LOOK 2
Outer: Men’s Dries Van Noten camel wool double breasted coat
Top: Men’s Sawhney navy lace and velvet button-down dress shirt
Skirt: The Dayz Tokyo (http://www.thedayztokyo.com)
Shoes: BeLLE (http://www.belle-co.jp)

What are your thoughts on Tokyo fashion culture? What are the differences you see compared with China?

In Tokyo, each area has its own characteristic style. For example, in ladies fashion there is Shibuya 109 style (http://www.shibuya109.jp), Harajuku style, Aoyama/Omotesando luxury style, Ebisu/Daikanyama pretty style, etc. In addition, each style has been shaped by the area’s history and culture. China has witnessed rapid growth recently but for the older generation unique characteristics in Chinese fashion culture did not exist. Rather, fashion was described more broadly as Korean fashion, Japanese fashion, European fashion, etc. Compared to China, Tokyo fashion has much more individuality and originality, which I think is amazing. That said, I think the Japanese are losing to the current generation of Chinese in terms of foreign intelligence gathering and global fashion interest.

What about menswear? What do you find attractive or interesting about modern Tokyo menswear?

I think women are constantly unfaithful in their loyalty with brands. But for men, once they fall in love with a brand, they can be a loyal customer for a very long time. As a result while women’s wear emphasizes design and styling, menswear puts more importance on quality material used and quality of construction. In a private or work setting, women look at a man’s sense of taste rather than his trendiness. A man that wears well made clothing or shoes gives a woman a sense of security which is a plus. I also think there is a sense of charm. I feel that Tokyo men put a lot of emphasis on styling and coordination. Tokyo men take advantage of accessories, hats, etc to show their style.

LOOK 3

Outer: Men’s Mihara Yasuhiro rabbit & goat fur down vest
Parka: Design Works
One-Piece: Zara
Shoes: Christian Louboutin
Sunglasses: Gucci

You received a job offer to work for Mark Styler after graduation. What are your thoughts about the future?

That’s correct. I received a job offer in Mark Styler’s global operations department, but recently I’ve been considering the business potentials in China and felt that working in Japan would deter me from my dream, so this month I declined the offer. After graduation, I plan to return back to China and I’m thinking of starting my own brand. At any rate, I think it’s necessary for me to understand the local Chinese market and develop the necessary personal connections.

Special thanks to Daisuke Ito of Trival Inc. for taking time out of his busy schedule to help with the shoot and more importantly Caca for modeling the men’s outerwear during this frigid Tokyo winter. Best of luck in your future endeavors!

Styling: Rajiv Sawhney designer of Sawhney (http://www.sawhney.jp)
Model: Caca Co (http://ameblo.jp/cocaca)
Photographer: Daisuke Ito of Trival Inc. (http://www.dai-ito.com)

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It’s been some time since we’ve featured an ‘It Girl’ here on Third Looks. In case you haven’t seen the other It Girl features, I’ll recap what the label means to me. These are girls who are are free-thinking, charismatic and stylish. These are the girls the world needs more of; the ones that eventually be be at the top of their respective fields.

With that out of the way, I’d like to introduce you to Rachel Hodin. She’s a New York native who grew up in the heart of Manhattan. The first time I met her Rachel was wearing 6″ Wheat Timberland Boots and pulling them off perfectly; a good start to any friendship. Rachel’s warm presence is balanced by a healthy dose of cynicism, in other words she’ll politely cut through the bullshit. Rachel is extremely well read AND will show up to your function in an effortlessly fashionable ensemble. What more can you really ask for out of friends in this city?

Rachel is currently a freelance writer for the The Local (New York Times Blog). You can read her very first published book review HERE.

A special thanks goes to Rebekah Seok for photographing this feature.

Look 1
Gap Denim Jacket
Ekhaus Latta pink fuzzy irrationally expensive cropped top [Ed.Note Rachel’s Description]
Chloe Sevigny for Opening Ceremony black and white Checkered Pants
Tsumori Chisato socks
Vintage Gucci loafers

Look 2
Kenzo striped dress
Acne Denim Jacket
Tsumori Chisato socks
Vintage Gucci loafers

What sparked your initial interest in clothes and fashion?

I guess it all started with Clueless. Traveling with my family at a young age–to paris and london–definitely helped as well.

I’ve never really been interested in fashion, per se, more so just looking good. I went to college in DC and that definitely inspired me, though in a reverse sort of way. i guess i was inspired to look good by all of the terribly and monotonously dressed people in DC.  (hope I don’t offend anyone)

You’re able to really mix designer items with vintage items and make it look very seamless. It’s a pretty delicate balance so how do you make it work?

I don’t tend to focus on the actual designer–just the piece at hand. If I like it, then I’ll wear it. Some of the pieces I like end up being designer, some end up being vintage. Most of my purchases are on impulse; I can’t seem to delay gratification.

Look 3
Rag and Bone Red Jeans
American Apparel cropped black top
Jimmy’s vintage Dior Monsieur bomber
Timberland Boots

How do you think growing up in New York has influenced your style? 

I think the city’s diversity and freedom of expression (encouraged by my parents) influenced me the most. I would find a “trend”–or my idea of one–and cling onto it for dear life. I became obsessed with the color neon green and made sure that every subsequent clothing purchase for the next year was of that hue.

Probably my biggest fashion influence growing up in the city were my best friends’ moms. Seriously, it’s an untapped fashion resource in this city.

I’ve been exposed to high fashion since I was very young. I’ve grown up with a ton of privileged kids and most of all what i’ve learned is that privilege does not amount to style.

Look 4

Vintage Rifat Ozbek Dress
Acne Leather Jacket w/ Detachable shearling Collar
Balenciaga white shoes
When you put together an outfit is there an you generally start from? (ie a jacket, shirt, jeans or shoes?)

Not to toot my own horn or anything, but I’ve recently amassed a dope collection of pants, so lately that’s where I’ve been starting.

What are some of your favorite places to shop in the city?

Narnia, Assembly NY, Brooklyn Flea, Edith Machinist, Opening Ceremony

Who’s style do you admire and look up to?

Don’t really look up to anyone’s style in particular. I admire people who dress for themselves, who incorporate their culture and background into their sartorial choices and, of course, my friends’ styles.

 

Be sure to follow Rachel on Twitteror visit her on the floor of Opening Ceremony in Soho. Rachel covers book readings and signings at the Greenlight Bookstore and you can read her work on The Local.

Words by Rocky Li
Photography by Rebekah Seok
Styling assistance by Jimmy Jimeno

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